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Monthly Archives: May 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(This was the first idea for our blog. It obviously didn’t last. But it’s also a good reminder that thinking and writing, and even reading, takes time, failure, editing, and sometimes even time off. Take them for what they are.)

Empson, Seven Types of Ambiguity

vs.

Auerbach, Mimesis

Joel,

This blog is supposedly about practical criticism, but I don’t think you even know what that means.  We need some concrete examples, and they need to be old and important.  Which would you say is more practical, Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis (1935) or William Empson’s Seven Types of Ambiguity (1930)?  What, for that matter, would it mean for criticism to be “practical” anyway? – Craig

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(This was the first idea for our blog. It obviously didn’t last. But it’s also a good reminder that thinking and writing, and even reading, takes time, failure, editing, and sometimes even time off. Take them for what they are.)

Gaiman Instructions

vs.

Auden Levine

Craig,

I was just reading W. H. Auden’s poem “The Quest,” which tells this very existentialist, very abstract version of a quest romance in a series of 20 sonnets, and it reminded me of Neil Gaiman’s new children’s book, “Instructions.”  Which do you think gets the genre of quest romance better?  I honestly don’t care what you think, since I’m pretty sure I have this figured out, but this is our first post, so humor me.  – Joel

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